The best products from the finest Italian regions

All the products from
Trentino Alto Adige region

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Trentino Alto Adige

The attractions of Trentino Alto Adige surely include the natural beauties of its territory, its artistic heritage, its rooted traditions and the eminent cultural activities, but also the variety of the agroindustrial products. Local products (especially the typical ones) reach their high quality level because of the particular characteristics of the location (climate, terrain) and of the techniques employed in cultivation and production; they significantly contribute to the promotion of the territory and to the diffusion of an idea of healthiness and naturalness, consistent with the culture of Trentino and its culinary traditions. The fundamental factors are the traditional techniques of handmade production, the ingredients and the local origin, influenced by historic and cultural aspects.

All the products from
Piemonte region

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Piemonte

An old traditional gastronomy, that over the years has been able to keep its hybrid nature, a combination of high-class cooking and rural flavours, sometimes rough, as shown by the sometimes very strong use of garlic, in order to season sauces and soups. Noble and humble recipes keep on mixing without interruption, creating one of the most original wine and food offers in Italy.

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Liguria

Ligurian gastronomy is deeply influenced by the geographic characteristics of this region, surrounded by sea and land, without any large plain. Cooking is therefore not based upon meat (breeding of animals is not very common) but the luxuriant nature and the copious rainfalls make the terrain particularly fertile for a high quantity of aromatic herbs, widely known and employed: marjoram, thyme, rosemary, sage, borage and the excellent basil (the main ingredient of the famous pesto), but also the walnut sauce and the one with aromatic mushrooms are particularly appreciated. Due to its history, Ligurian cooking can be defined as a perfect example of a complete Mediterranean cooking, produced by nature and human work. Ligurian recipes, some humble and simple, some rich and tasty, reflect the creativity of the local people and the best traditions from abroad. An important aspect of Ligurian cooking is the technique of conservation of food, like mushrooms in oil, jams, honey, salted anchovies, the brine and many sauces and preserves. Traditional recipes of desserts, often dated many centuries ago, include the excellent "canestrelli", the "gobeletti", the cookies, the "amaretti" and the "pandolce", a kind of panettone with a reduced leavening and largely filled with candied fruits and raisins. Another dessert is the "chinotto" from Savona, a kind of small bitter orange, cultivated in the area of Varazze, put in syrup and prepared in the form of liqueur or preserve. (chiudi)

All the products from
Lombardia region

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Lombardy

Fertile flatlands, verdant foothills, and snowy mountains. Rice and corn thrive in the northern climate, resulting in a rich repertoire of risottos and polentas. Veal, beef, butter, and cow's milk cheeses appear at nearly every meal, and sweetwater fish caught in Lombardy's many lakes (including Italy's largest, Lago di Garda, and its most opulent, Lago di Como) round out the diet. What we offer as a Luxury food of this region is Caviar Beluga and Siberian. From Brescia, to be precise. Italy has been the largest exporter of caviar for years. Though no traditional caviar producer, Italy has managed to achieve excellence in the sector. "Actually, the sturgeon belongs more to Italy's culinary history than most people realise.

All the products from
Friuli Venezia Giulia region

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Friuli Venezia Giulia

Friuli-Venezia Giulia is another region whose cuisine straddles the borders and shares common culinary traditions. There are a number of cured meats, or salumi, from Friuli worth seeking out. Prosciutto di San Daniele DOP is perhaps the most well known and sought after. You should also look for Prosciutto di Sauris, which comes from Sauris, a small city in Carnia where it is smoked and aged. The region’s most famous cheese, Montasio, is a firm flavorful cheese used when making Frico, a cheese crisp that can be formed into an edible basket for holding risotto or gnocchi. Grated Montasio slowly cooked on the stovetop can also have potato or onion added to it. FVG is known for their white wines; Collio Goriziano and Friuli Isonzo are two of several to look for, along with the well known dessert wine, Ramandolo, protected by a DOCG designation. The wines we offer are produced by one of the most ancient winery of FVG whose owners’ ambition is to keep their production a niche range.

All the products from
Emilia Romagna region

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Emilia Romagna

Fresh egg pasta is rolled and cut into lasagne, tagliatelle, tortellini, cappelletti, and tortelli stuffed with various ingredients like beef, poulty, ricotta and swiss chard, cheese, eggs and herbs. Cooks in the region have a penchant for rich flavors and spectacular presentation, and are especially skilled at making all manner of stuffed pasta by hand. Emilia-Romagna is home to many of the country's most renowned foods: Prosciutto di Parma, Mortadella, Parmigiano-Reggiano, and balsamic vinegar to name a few. Whatever your taste is, Balsamic Vinegar of Modena is one of those Italian ingredients that cannot miss on your table. From salads to ice-cream, this condiment is a touch of real Italian gourmet taste. Find yours in our line of Balsamic Vinegars: aged, flavoured, black and white.

All the products from
Tuscany region

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Tuscany

Tuscany is a real heaven for gluttons from the whole world. The typical Tuscan cooking includes traditional natural and tasty dishes, prepared with simple ingredients. This region's culinary tradition is mainly based on some products and some recipes. Soups are strong points of the Tuscan rural tradition: very old recipes which served as complete meal, filling the stomach with little expense. Vegetables and legumes added to stale bread, then seasoned with garlic and onion. The most famous ones are the "ribollita", the kale soup, the soup with beans and the tomato "papa", but also the very simple "panzanella". Another soup is the "cacciucco", the soup with the so-called "poor" fish, typical of Livorno area, which was once prepared with the unsold remains of fishing. Together with soups, pasta is also very important on Tuscan tables. Tuscan pasta is rigorously handmade and is mainly combined with meat sauces. "Pappardelle" with boar meat or hare sauce and "pici" with sauce are very appreciated, together with recipes containing more simple ingredients, like mushrooms, artichoke and tomato. Beyond seasoning pasta, meat is the most common main course. It is sufficient to mention the very famous fiorentina steak, obtained by the slice of the loin of the Chianina race steer. It is also frequent to serve game, white meat, pork and "cinta senese", prepared in every form: both as "rosticciana" (sausages, ribs and seasoned grilled steaks) and as cold cuts and cured meats (ham, salami, "buristo", "finocchiona"). Some more particular Tuscan specialities are the lard from Colonnata, the tripe and the "lampredotto", which is common around Florence. Another fundamental product is the Tuscan pecorino cheese, fresh or aged, made with sheep milk: it can be combined with honey, jams, pears and walnuts or eaten melted, on grilled bread or grated on pasta, essential part of some recipes, like the tasty "pici" with cheese and pepper. We find simple and energizing ingredients in the traditional Tuscan desserts as well, where doughs are seasoned with dried fruit, chestnuts and honey. It's the process of creation of all the sweets from Siena, like "ricciarelli", "cantucci", "panforte", "cavallucci", chestnut cake, "brigidini" and "pan co'santi". Tuscan sweets can be excellently combined with the "vinsanto", a sweet wine which is produced with Trebbiano, Malvasia or Sangiovese grapes, after a quite hard fermentation process. (chiudi)

All the products from
Veneto region

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Veneto

Veneto is the Italian region which presents the deepest territorial and environmental differences, as it can offer sea, lagoons, plains, lakes, hills and snow-capped mountains. Such a geomorphological variety affects its complex culinary tradition, offered by our rich selection of high-quality typical handmade products. Veneto is the birthplace of two desserts belonging to the pantheon of international pastry-making: the "tiramisu", based on mascarpone cheese, eggs, coffee and Marsala, and the "pandoro", with its soft buttery paste. And don't miss the "frittole" with raisins, the "venexiana" fried cream and the "carfagn", with grappa and poppy seeds. Under an enological point of view, Veneto is an eminent region, with the quantitative record as for production, a great ampelographical variety and a lot of very prestigious wines. "Amarone" is internationally considered one of the great Italian red wines, whereas "Bardolino Superiore DOCG" and "Valpolicella" (based on the "Corvina" grape from Verona, in various blends and percentages) are known for their balance and complexity. "Soave Superiore" and "Bianco di Custoza" appear amongst the most important Italian white wines. "Recioto di Soave" and "Torcolato di Breganze" are excellent wines for dessert. "Prosecco di Conegliano-Valdobbiadene" is a very renowned DOC sparkling wine. Grappas from Veneto are very appreciated. Our selection offers the best of artisan production, where everything is made in strict conformity with the old traditions. (chiudi)

All the products from
Umbria region

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Umbria

Umbria cooking is based on tradition, with dishes which aren't always poor or popular. Lowly influenced by near regions, it is essentially based on meat and agricultural products, which are used both on great occasions and in everyday meals. It's a simple cooking, with basic manufacturing processes, enhancing the flavours of the ingredients. The roots of cooking in Umbria descend from the culture of the ancient peoples of Umbrians and Romans, characterized by a frequent use of legumes and cereals. It is possible to define three big areas, roughly corresponding with the social and cultural subdivision of the region. Manufacturing of pork meat and cold cuts is typical of the whole territory: the most renowned ones come from the area of Norcia, the origin of the Italian term "norcino", defining par excellence the producer and retailer of cold cuts. Umbrian flavours are enriched by other "noble" ingredients, such as the truffle, real symbol of this cooking (especially in the eastern mountains and in the Valnerina valley), and the extra virgin olive oil, necessary in almost every local recipe. The areas of Orvieto, Montefalco and Lake Trasimeno are famous for their wine varietals, which originate many DOP wines. (chiudi)

All the products from
Lazio region

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Lazio

Traditional cooking in Rome and Lazio is based on agricultural ingredients, obtained from vegetables and animals, prepared in conformity with recipes which are often passed down from one generation and family to another; the very fertile land has always expressed recipes and dishes which had to satisfy the energetic needs of the farmers. This cooking is based on first courses, both dry and in soup. These last ones are prepared with pasta with vegetables or legumes (chickpeas, potatoes, broccolis, beans) and the so-called "quinto quarto" (fifth quarter). On feast days it was very frequent to serve roast lambs and goat meat, provided by local shepherds. Since Rome was founded, the poorest social classes have always based their cooking on the products from the near Agro, on "farinate" and on legumes. No wonder the famous "puls" of Romans (who in fact were called "pultiferi", meaning "polenta eaters") was a mush with cereals and legumes, which assumed other names and flavours according to what it was combined with. Chickpeas were the most common legumes, also on rich people's tables. They were the first course of dinner, soaked with oil and served hot in earthenware bowls. Some centuries later, common people began cooking the legume soup as an eve dish, like pasta, chickpeas and salted codfish. (chiudi)

All the products from
Campania region

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Campania

Campania is one of the main destinations of culinary tourism; its cooking can actually offer some dishes and ingredients which are symbols of Italian food: pizza, mozzarella, pasta, tomato and basil! Neapolitan cooking has often represented the whole Italian cooking abroad. Neapolitans were in fact the first to be called "mangiamaccheroni", a disparaging term which later referred to all Italian emigrants in the world. The most famous Italian dish in the world is probably…pizza! The well-known "pizza margherita" was created, during the nineteenth century, to honor the queen Margherita di Savoia, using the colors white, red and green, reminding the Italian flag. But the oldest pizza (and the Neapolitan one par excellence) is the "marinara", containing just tomato, garlic, oil and oregano. You can also try the "calzone" (a pizza filled with cold cuts, ricotta and cheese) and the fried pizza, identical to the "calzone", but completely fried in oil! The most appreciated first courses are pastas, spaghetti or "vermicelli", prepared especially with seafood; "maccheroni" and "ziti" are, instead, generally combined with red sauces. Naples ragu is very famous; its preparation requested many hours of cooking on the burner. The Neapolitan "pasta e fagioli" (pasta with beans) is considered to be the best in Italy, also in the famous song "That's ammore", praising the "past'e fasule". The "pasta alla Genovese" is simply the mangled name of the French "ginevrino" (meaning "from Geneva"), a tasty and delicate onion sauce, created during the Angevin period. Among the most famous dishes we also have to mention the "sartù" of rice, filled with "fegatielli" and the "casatiello", a salty pie which is typically served during the Easter period. On the coast of Amalfi and Sorrento you can easily find the "paste terra-cielo" ("land-sky pastas"), like the one with beans and mussels and the famous "colatura" of anchovies, descending from the "garum" of ancient Romans. But cooking in Campania cannot be limited to the traditions of Naples and the coasts: the inland areas are well-known for big pastas ("cavatelli" or "cicatielli"), served with robust sauces based on pecorino cheese, mutton and mushrooms. In the Apennine areas some appreciated dishes are the shells with sauce, the soup with celery and salted codfish and, in Sannio area, the soup with cardoon, with broth of capon, meatballs, cheese, eggs and cardoons, plus the "panzarotti" of chickpeas and cinnamon. Main meals can differ much, depending on the geographical area (sea or inland): snappers, surmullets, scorpionfish, oratas, sea bass and swordfish can be cooked on the grill or covered by salt or cooked in the "acqua pazza" way. An appreciated speciality is fried fish, the so-called "frittura di paranza". The typical dishes of mountain areas are roasts, sausages, the rabbit ("all'ischitana" or "all'irpina", famous cooking ways to prepare it) and the "ammugliatiello", a tasty pork chop with lamb, lung and liver; as for side dishes, we can mention the Matese mushrooms, the Roccamonfina chestnuts and the famous "friarielli", a particular kind of broccolis, typical of Campania, fried and flavoured with chili pepper; and also the aubergines, in the "funghetti" way or in the famous "parmigiana", a recipe which reached Naples thanks to relations with Sicily; or the zucchini, prepared in the "scapece" way, with lesser calamint and vinegar, a dish of Spanish origin, as shown by its name. Two popular and tasty dishes are the tripe with salad and the sautéed vegetables, with offal and spicy ragu. The top speciality on the cutting board in Campania is definitely the buffalo mozzarella DOP, but you can also taste other great buffalo dairy products, such as ricotta and provola, also in the smoked version. A savoury sausage from Salerno is the "tarantiello", made of tuna belly. The Neapolitan salami and the provolone cheese from Sorrento are renowned as well. Amalfi coast and Cilento area offer delicious fresh cheeses, whereas Irpinia and Sannio areas produce a high number of aged cheeses and "caciocavalli podolici". As for sweets, we must mention the delicious desserts based on ricotta, such as the "pastiera" and the "sfogliatelle", but also the exquisite nougats (in the two versions, hard and soft), particularly renowned in Avellino area and at San Marco dei Cavoti, near Benevento. You can't miss the famous "zeppola di San Giuseppe", fried wafer filled with cream. The "delizia al limone" is a speciality of the coasts of Sorrento and Amalfi, whereas Capri has given its name to the famous "caprese" cake, based on chocolate. The coasts of Amalfi and Sorrento are also well-known for the limoncello: its main ingredient is a famous local kind of lemon. The tonic liquor "Amaro Strega", from Benevento, is a renowned digestif. And to end your lunch…a famous Neapolitan coffee! Though the Neapolitan moka pot works through infusion, influenced by Arab coffee, local habits suggest to drink a quantity of coffee which corresponds to very few teaspoons! (chiudi)

All the products from
Puglia region

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Puglia

Cooking in Puglia gives a substantial importance to the ingredients, of whatever origin (the sea or the inland), as they are used to enhance the flavours of the products, rather than to alter them. So you'll find all the seasonal vegetables, such as turnip tops, cabbages, cardoons, peppers, aubergines, artichokes, all the legumes (beans, lentils, "cicerchias", fava beans) and all the sea products, especially those from Adriatic; these last ones are very peculiar, because of the particular grazing which is present on those coasts and of the freshwater springs draining into the sea and therefore attenuating the salty taste, without altering its smell. Some dishes are served in the whole region, but most of the recipes belong to a single province or even a single town; so the recipes of Bari, Brindisi and Taranto areas, close to the sea, differ from the ones of the hilly Foggia or the rural Lecce. Cooking in Puglia offers a very high number of recipes, with a trait which is distinctive of this region: different dishes corresponding to the different seasons, so that vegetables and fish prevail in spring and summer whereas during the cold seasons the most common dishes are legumes and homemade pasta, combined with various sauces, sometimes coupled with vegetables and fish. The most typical recipe is "orecchiette al ragu di carne di cavallo" ("orecchiette" pasta with horse meat ragu), reported in all recipe books, but other renowned ones are "orecchiette with turnip tops", "chicory with fava beans purée" and the dishes which link the Mediterranean Sea to the inland, such as "cavatelli with mussels" and roasted rice in the "barese" way, also named "potatoes, rice and mussels". The most common dishes appear in all recipe books, but some old recipes are waning, because of the effort they request to be prepared; they should definitely be included in some recipe books, or they could be lost soon. (chiudi)

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Sicily

Sicilian cooking is the result of the culinary arts which were practiced in Sicily since the ancient times and is closely related to historical, cultural and religious events of this island. A particular cooking style dates back to the age of Ancient Greece, but it was enriched by new flavours and dishes over the centuries, following the various historical events. Sicilian cooking is quite complex; according to the opinion of many, it offers the highest number of specialities and is the most beautiful cooking, under an aesthetic point of view, in the whole Italy. Some of the most renowned specialities, widespread all over the world, are the Sicilian "cassata", the Sicilian "cannolo", the "granita" and the fried rice balls. Thanks to its temperate climate, the island is rich in spices and aromatic plants; oregano, mint and rosemary are usual ingredients of Sicilian sauces. The fertile terrain produces large quantities of oranges and lemons. And Sicily is also famous for almonds, prickly pears, pistachios and olives. Although some shared traits characterize the culinary arts all over Sicily, each sicilian area (even very small ones) can serve particular dishes, that you will not find elsewhere. Most of them are variations of the same regional recipe, but in some cases (the "panelle" from Palermo or the "muccunetti" from Mazara del Vallo, for example) these dishes are prepared and served in their area of origin only. This cooking peculiarity has often suggested a culinary division between Western Sicily, Central Sicily and Eastern Sicily. (chiudi)